American Healthcare at the Mercy of Congressional Funding - Veterans Today veteranstoday.com

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American Healthcare at the Mercy of Congressional Funding - Veterans Today

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Health Editor’s Note: Healthcare issues concern all Americans and should be at the top of any governmental list for spending.  After much gnashing of political teeth, CHIP has funding for another 10 years. Republicans did what they could to stop funding. 

Medicare outpatient therapy payments have had their cap removed.  With the intense work to get a patient out of the hospital as soon as possible (maybe when the patient should still have around the clock observation and care) there was not going to be a good outcome for limiting Medicare outpatient therapy payments. 

Health can not be the low rung on the Congressional funding ladder. Healthcare should not be subjected to ebbs and tides of funding withdrawal, but should be reliable and constant to those who need it. 

Why should someone who has been deemed terminally ill have to wait to be given a drug/treatment that has not been given full approval by the FDA?  The FDA can waste years testing while people could be getting a potential cure.  A terminally ill person has nothing to lose and everything to gain by being allowed to make his or her own decision about going all out for a chance to save his or her life……Carol 

D.C. Week: Congress Passes Spending Bill

Novel 3-Drug combo for HIV gains FDA approval

by Shannon Firth, Washington Correspondent, MedPage Today

WASHINGTON — Just before dawn on Friday, Congress passed another short-term spending bill that addresses several significant healthcare issues, such as the opioid crisis and keeping community health centers running, and it keeps the government open until late March.

Congress Passes Short-Term Spending Bill

Congress passed a stopgap spending bill early Friday that included 10 years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and $7.8 billion for community health centers (CHCs), and permanently removed a cap on Medicare outpatient therapy payments.

The measure passed by a vote of 71-28 in the Senate and 240-186 in the House; President Trump has signed it.

The bill, which will keep the government open through March 23, also includes funding for assisting victims of national disaster in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and it repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), an unpopular feature of the Affordable Care Act. It also extends CHIP for 10 years, up from the 6-year extension the program received in the previous short-term spending bill.

The CHIP extension is “just remarkable providing unprecedented security and certainty for the families that depend on CHIP, and the state governments that need more predictability to map out their own expenditures,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah).

Top Democrat Blasts GOP on Healthcare

Saying congressional Republicans have made “concerted efforts” to be “deeply disruptive” towards American healthcare, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) ripped GOP leadership during a speech here Tuesday.

Lawmakers from both parties need to “reach across the aisle” to address healthcare, he declared.

Hoyer, the second-ranking Democrat in the House since 2011 and House Majority Leader from 2007-2011, spoke at the AcademyHealth National Health Policy Conference for 20 minutes in a hastily-scheduled session that organizers had squeezed into the program only the day before. He rarely looked down at his notes as he addressed a packed hotel ballroom, seeming less like a politician and more like a man who had something to get off his chest.

“What America’s healthcare system needs is stability,” Hoyer said, hammering on staple Democratic themes regarding Republican efforts to undermine the Affordable Care Act and the “dangerous instability” that has resulted.

More Help Needed With Opioid Crisis, Senators Told

Congress has made strides in helping battle the opioid abuse epidemic, but much more needs to be done, witnesses told a Senate committee on Thursday.

“The opioid epidemic is taking a terrible toll on pregnant women and infants,” Stephen Patrick MD, MPH, a neonatologist at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn., said at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions (HELP) Committee hearing on the effect of the opioid crisis on children and families. “Every day, people are dying. Pregnant women are not getting the treatment they need and infants are spending their first few weeks in withdrawal … These are our brothers and sisters and they need our help.”

Legislation passed by Congress, including the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, the 21st Century Cures Act, and the Protecting Our Infants Act “moved forward important public health priorities but would benefit from additional [reinforcement],” Patrick said. For example, “The Protecting our Infants Act resulted in a comprehensive strategy document from SAMHSA [the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration], but as [SAMHSA] notes, implementation is dependent on funding.”

Pressure Rises for Right-to-Try Bill

Earlier this week, two Republican congressmen sent a letter to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) urging them to bring a “right-to-try” bill to a vote in the House as soon as possible.

The bill, called the Trickett Wendler, Frank Mongiello, Jordan McLinn, and Matthew Bellina Right to Try Act, passed in the Senate last August.

It would allow individuals with life-threatening illnesses to obtain experimental drugs prior to FDA approval. However, the law does not require drug companies to make their products available, and the FDA already has a pathway to allow such access. Industry in general has not sought changes to that pathway. Nevertheless, some in Congress are unsatisfied with the FDA’s policies and implementation and are seeking to loosen the reins.

“The fundamental purpose of the Right to Try Act is very simple: it merely allows terminally ill patients who have exhausted all other options to try medications that have passed basic Food and Drug Administration safety protocols but not completed the full, multi-year approval process. This bill safeguards any pharmaceutical company that may wish to participate in Right to Try, but it in no way requires participation to begin with,” wrote Reps. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.) in a letter signed by 40 other members and sent to House leadership on Monday.

New 3-Drug Combo for HIV OK’d

A new three-drug combination pill for HIV-1 infection won FDA approval late Wednesday, said manufacturer Gilead Sciences.

To be sold as Biktarvy, the product includes the integrase inhibitor bictegravir and two reverse transcriptase inhibitors, emtricitabine and tenofovir alafenamide. It is approved for once-daily oral administration, with no food intake requirement, baseline viral load, or CD4+ cell count restrictions, Gilead said.

Published at Tue, 13 Feb 2018 19:26:08 +0000

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